If you get your water from a well, it’s important to know how much it will cost you and your family over the course of your lifetime in the home.  In this post we will cover routine maintenance costs such as periodic well water testing, replacement of the well pump, and finally the cost of drilling a water well.

Below is a laundry list of any and all costs associated with residential wells. A recent testimonial says it best. “I was sticker shocked when I got the bill for my well repair…. For what I paid just in overtime and minor parts, I could have paid for WelGard® for several years.”

New Well

Since no one can guarantee where water will be located, they can’t say how many holes will need to be drilled, and the cost is expressed in “per foot” ranging from $10 – $15. Add to this costs for set-up, casing, grouting, drilling shoes, pumps, and hook-ups and it’s clear that the professional with the lowest drilling cost per foot may not be the cheapest overall.

Last year, the average cost of a new well was between $10,000 and $15,000, with price-tags as high as $50,000. Not to mention the non-financial “costs” of delays due to contractor availability, ranging from several days up to 6 months before the problems are corrected.

Well Pumps

This cost depends primarily on your specific system type and well depth. Installed prices average between $1,800 and $2,500.

We have seen these prices increase over 50% since we began our services 15 years ago, since they are a function of supply and demand for the services required. Prices can also depend on the day/time of day you call, your location, and other variables.  Learn more  about the different kinds of well pumps here.

Misc. Repairs

These charges are generally based upon an initial response, plus the cost of supplies, and an hourly rate for the crew and related equipment. An average charge for a repair call is $150 – $200 on weekdays during normal business hours, with rates doubling for calls during evenings, weekends, and holidays.

Supplies are charged as needed (often only available during normal business hours) and the hourly rate for a crew is between $125 and $150.

Watch out for “mark ups” of materials: it’s not uncommon for parts’ prices and labor charges to be inflated, depending on the firm dispatched.

Water Tests

Water can be tested for a wide variety of factors – volatile and stable, organic and inorganic, chemical and biological – and can cost hundreds of dollars.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as state and local agencies recommend testing for pH, nitrates and bacteria. Tests performed by certified laboratories, using their own water samplers cost between $100 – $150.

How does the cost of a new well compare to other homeowner expenses? Learn more in a recent post here.

Protect your family’s water supply with WelGard Protection. One low annual fee buys you 24/7 response if anything happens to your well. And we do mean anything. If you don’t already have The Best warranty for your well, learn more today. We got you covered.

The Well Worth It Blog is all about residential wells, why we love them, and how to keep yours healthy and flowing clean, drinkable water for you and your family.