Many homeowners often ask how rain can affect their well water?  Moderate snows in winter and an abundant rainfall in spring and summer means that the water tables will be higher than they were before the record drought, but does not assure your well will continue to be safe and reliable.

First, the widely publicized drought was not just a 1-year phenomenon. The water tables in the Piedmont Region had been dropping (to lower levels) over the prior 5 years (1997-2002) and in fact have made significant gains over the past decade.

Heavy rainfall, though, does not all become groundwater available for local wells.

In addition to the precipitation that is retained in local reservoirs, much of the rain and snow runs off into other non-local bodies of water. Rainfall doesn’t immediately become groundwater, since it seeps through the ground at a rate of only 10 feet per year. The benefit of heavy rainfall to your well may not be fully realized, if there is a benefit at all.

High levels of precipitation cause well owners other problems with higher frequency and levels of Coliform bacteria occurring during such periods.

Local realtors are finding much more frequent and higher levels of bacteria, which require chlorination prior to sale.  So while no one should be singing “Rain, rain go away…”, well owners still need to consider the impact of natural events on this very important and expensive system for their homes.

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The Well Worth It Blog is all about residential wells, why we love them, and how to keep yours healthy and flowing clean, drinkable water for you and your family.